Sarah Ockler

The pajama diaries

55 notes

Twenty Boy Summer? Okay, that’s it. I’m hiring this person to coordinate all my book outfits from now on. :-)
fashion-by-the-book:

Twenty Boy Summer by Sarah Ockler
Find it here
“Weeping is not the same thing as crying. It takes your whole body to weep, and when it’s over, you feel like you don’t have any bones left to hold you up.”

Twenty Boy Summer? Okay, that’s it. I’m hiring this person to coordinate all my book outfits from now on. :-)

fashion-by-the-book:

Twenty Boy Summer by Sarah Ockler

Find it here

“Weeping is not the same thing as crying. It takes your whole body to weep, and when it’s over, you feel like you don’t have any bones left to hold you up.”

7 notes

And one for Bittersweet, too? That’s pretty much the most adorable way to start my Tuesday!
fashion-by-the-book:

Bittersweet by Sarah Ockler
Find it here
“But once in a while, you pick the right thing, the exact best thing. Every day, the moment you open your eyes and pull off your blankets, that’s what you hope for. The sunshine on your face,warm enough to make you heart sing.”

And one for Bittersweet, too? That’s pretty much the most adorable way to start my Tuesday!

fashion-by-the-book:

Bittersweet by Sarah Ockler

Find it here

“But once in a while, you pick the right thing, the exact best thing. Every day, the moment you open your eyes and pull off your blankets, that’s what you hope for. The sunshine on your face,warm enough to make you heart sing.”

16 notes

An outfit for The Book of Broken Hearts! If only I had this for my tour last summer!
fashion-by-the-book:

The Book of Broken Hearts by Sarah Ockler
Find it here
“For all its ridiculous imperfections, life is pretty damn perfect sometimes.”

An outfit for The Book of Broken Hearts! If only I had this for my tour last summer!

fashion-by-the-book:

The Book of Broken Hearts by Sarah Ockler

Find it here

“For all its ridiculous imperfections, life is pretty damn perfect sometimes.”

4,233 notes

Men write universal stories. Women write stories for girls. Men write Literature. Women write chick lit. Even in a world where women do publish in heavier numbers than men do, they are underscored, underseen, and undervalued. Twilight is and will remain a crucial part of YA’s history — YA’s female-driven history — despite or in spite of the fact it doesn’t garner the same praises that those held up as idols within the community do. Men like John Green become symbols of YA’s forward progress and Seriousness as a category, whereas Stephenie Meyer gets to be a punchline.
A Censored History of Ladies in YA Fiction (via catagator)

(via abbywritesbooks)

Filed under girls in ya gender inequality ya literature

302 notes

THE CORRECT WAY TO STRESS WHEN YOU WORK IN COOKBOOK PUBLISHING

The thing is I literally just baked a whole cake and now I’m about to eat said cake and I’m like Tumblr stop watching me, just stop!

(It’s gingerbread cake, with vanilla cream cheese frosting, in case you’re wondering. And it’s my go-to career stress cake.)

bethrevis:

elloellenoh:

yahighway:

dudeinpublishing:

image

image

This is relevant for all publishing

This is so relevant I can taste it.

Now I want cake.

Filed under cake publishing

5,412 notes

Working writers? The paucity of pajamas in this series is highly problematic!

wordpainting:

Writers at Work …

1. William Faulkner

2. Susan Sontag

3. J.K. Rowling

4. Anne Sexton

5. John Steinbeck

6. Jack Kerouac

7. George Orwell

8. George Bernard Shaw

9. Stephen King

10. Maya Angelou

(via judithteweswrites)

12 notes

On the Amtrak residency: residencies versus contests, dreams versus desperation

Author Janni Lee Simner articulates why the reality of the much-hyped Amtrak writer’s residency turned out to be way less shiny than the original idea.

In a nutshell, applicants are required to give away 10 pages of their work just for the possibility of winning a train ticket.

But. Even more disturbing to me than the whole giving-away-your-work thing? This little-discussed clause in Amtrak’s Official Terms:

"Applicant understands and agrees that Sponsor has wide access to ideas, stories and other literary, artistic and creative materials submitted to it from outside sources or developed by its own employees and agents (together, “Sponsor Creative”); and, such Sponsor Creative may be competitive with, similar to (or even identical to) the writing sample/answers to questions created and submitted by Applicants; and, Sponsor shall have no liability to Applicant or any third party in respect to or in connection with the development, use, sale and/or commercial exploitation of all or any portion of Sponsor Creative by Sponsor and/or its designees and licensees, all of which liability, if any, Applicant hereby expressly and irrevocably waives, releases and discharges." —Amtrak official terms, clause 5, last paragraph

I’m not a lawyer, but that sounds an awful lot like “we can steal your work word for word, call it our own, sell it as our own, make money from it as if we’d written it ourselves, and there’s not a damn thing you can do about it because you’re giving us permission.”

Writers, read the fine print. And if you’d like to write on a train, there are probably other ways to get there.

Check out Janni’s excellent thoughts via the link below:

jannileesimner:

On the #AmtrakResidency: residencies versus contests, dreams versus desperation

When I first heard that Amtrak was considering having writers-in-residenceon its trains, I was pretty captivated by the idea. I find trains deeply evocative, liminal, even mythic. I loved the idea of hopping on board for a multi-day trip (instead of my previous several hour or single-day rides), of watching the landscape roll by, of chatting with my fellow passengers, and of, presumably, writing…

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Filed under AmtrakResidency writers rights